Project Quilting Stitch in Time Entry

Project Quilting Stitch in Time Entry

So…I thought about the challenge for Project Quilting this week…A STITCH IN TIME SAVES NINE. And nothing came to me for several days. I thought this would be the week I just didn’t enter.

Then, as I was thinking about the time change this Sunday…and about having more daylight, …the sun was shining (even though we did get more snow a few days ago)…and the birds were singing outside. They weren’t singing their usual winter chirps, but their special beautiful spring time songs! Then I thought about how I should be saving bits of colorful ribbon, yarn, and little strips of fabric and putting them outside so the birds could use them because they’ll be building their nests soon. And the idea for the challenge came to me…

I started to equate “a stitch in time” with the little birds getting their nests “stitched” together with bits of string and twigs. And then I started to visualize nests made out of fabric selvages and bright fabric strips. And the idea started taking shape!

I used scraps from my stash to flip and sew the background, and fused the appliqué shapes on top. Then cut up a bunch of my selvedge edges I’ve been saving and quilted them down to create the nest.

I even found the Stonehedge fabric selvage from their fabric called “a stitch in time”!! What are the chances? Totally unplanned! How cool was that?

So here’s my entry for Project Quilting Season 9, Challenge #5 “A Stitch in Time”. I hope you’ll stop by the website to vote for your 10 favorite entries. Voting starts after noon (Wisconsin time) on Sunday, March 11, 2018 and I think it runs through Friday, March 16, 2018.,

Until next time…HAPPY QUILTING!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts

Project Quilting Last Challenge for 2016 #PQ7

Project Quilting Last Challenge for 2016 #PQ7

#PQ7 There’s one last challenge this year for Kim Lapacek’s PROJECT QUILTING (2016).  My goal this winter was to make a quilt or quilted item for each challenge.  And I’ve just made it!

When I heard the challenge was “A Goose in the Monkey Wrench”, I immediately thought about creating my own version of a large “Monkey Wrench” block  by inserting “Flying Geese” into and maybe around it.  I opened up my Electric Quilt (EQ7) and found the “Monkey Wrench” block, then inserted Flying Geese around the structure of the block.  It needed more, so I played around with adding flying geese in the  border, turning and twisting them until I found an interesting pattern.

PQ EQ7

This is what I came up with (above) after several trials and quite  few different colorings.  I’ve always wanted to do flying geese in gradated colors….now’s my chance.

PQ EQ7a

EQ7 allows me to print my drawing as a paper piecing pattern so I can print it on my favorite foundations—Carol Doak’s Foundation Paper.  After gathering some of my batiks and hand dyed fabrics in the colors I needed, I started paper piecing the center of the mini art quilt

PQ EQ7b

What I love about paper piecing is the precise points.  I could never do that with regular cutting and piecing.  Some people can…but not me.

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Here’s what it looked like after the center was finished and I started on the “flying geese” border—yikes, there’s a lot of little pieces!  Looks overwhelming.

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The only thing I don’t like about paper piecing is peeling all the little bits of paper off the back of the quilt top after it’s sewn together…but a good movie, and it goes quickly.

PQ EQ7e

Here (above) is the mini art quilt–quilted, bound, and finished.  It’s now for sale in my Etsy Shop here.

PQ EQ7f

I like the curves that were created by the flying geese around the border—reminds me of ribbons.

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I chose to do a simple stitch by the ditch (not “in the ditch”) quilting.

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Here’s the finished quilt (above), and the EQ7 rendition (below).    PQ EQ7

The colors are different, but it did turn out very much like my EQ7 rendition.

So the Challenge is finished for this year.  I want to send a special “thank you” to Kim Lapacek (and her mother) for all the hard work to make PROJECT QUILTING a reality.

I hope you’ll stop by Kim’s “Persimons Dream” website to vote for your favorite entries.  The voting begins at noon Sunday, March 20 and ends March 25.

I got the chance to talk with Kim at the Sun Prairie Quilt Show just a few weeks ago–she’s so much fun (that’s her on the right).  Catch her website to find out more about the quilts shown in the background.

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UPDATE:  The voting has ended and mine came in at second place (out of 32 entries).  Thanks so much for your votes!  It was a lot of fun.  Looking forward to next year!

Until next time, HAPPY QUILTING,
AND

HAPPY NATIONAL QUILTING DAY!!!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts

Project Quilting Challenge: Vacation

Project Quilting Challenge: Vacation

This week’s Project Quilting Challenge is “I NEED A VACATION”.  My favorite vacations are traveling to a beautiful spot, finding a cabin or home to rent, and relax by the lake, river, or ocean and just take in the beautiful view.  We might do some day trips in the area, like hiking or going out for lunch, but always coming back to the serenity and beauty of the surroundings of the spot we’ve rented.

I found a photograph I had taken this past summer when we ventured up to one of our favorite spots near Bayfield, Wisconsin.  A short walk from the back of our cottage is a rocky private beach with a spectacular view of Lake Superior, with Bass Island and the rest of the Apostle Islands, in the background…it was breathtaking!  I loved walking down to that spot with a cup of coffee every morning to take it all in.  So when I heard “I need a vacation” as the theme, this is where I’d want to be.

My first step in creating the scene was to find fabrics that had the same feel as the photograph (and my memory of it), and cut a piece of batting and backing to the size I wanted to serve as the backdrop “canvas”.

PQVaHow1

Then I cut and positioned the background and shoreline onto the batting.  I had just purchased something new—a Fons&Porter glue pen.  It worked great to keep everything in place.  I found it a lot less messy than the regular glue stick.

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Bit by bit, auditioning fabrics–some that didn’t work, and others that did, I continued adding to the scene.

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I thought the trees and bushes needed a bit more depth, so I got out my soft pastels and went to work, shading the foliage…

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And adding some depth to the water and rocks…

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I’m glad I purchased the set (on sale).  I used a blending stick to blend it in.

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The sailboat is small in the distance, so I decided to create it by thread painting…

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After quilting, I wanted to add a border…so I auditioned several different fabrics and came down to three possibilities…

I didn’t care for the dark blue-grey, it seemed too dark and gloomy.

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The blue batik was interesting, but the black piping was too harsh…

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I felt the brown brought out the color of the rocks, so I went with that…

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Here the borders have been added…along with more batting and backing.

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And here’s the finished art quilt…

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With a close up of the water…

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and the thread painted sailboat in the distance.

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I hope you’ve enjoyed the journey, and that you’ll stop by Persimon Dreams website PROJECT QUILTING and vote for your favorite quilts!

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The voting begins February 21 and runs through February 26 (2016).

UPDATE:  The voting has closed.  I came in #3 of 39 entries–no prize, but no bad!

Until next time, HAPPY QUILTING!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts

Mosaic Pixelated Quilted Wall Hanging

Mosaic Pixelated Quilted Wall Hanging

I found this photo of my dad (Harry Haverkate) that I  just love.  Isn’t he handsome?

DD1

I’m not sure of the year, but It was probably taken around the time he was dating my mom (early 1930’s), when he was in his early 20’s.  Back in the time when men often wore suits and always wore a hat.  I thought dad looked so “dapper” with his hat tilted just right.  So I named this quilted wall hanging “Dapper Dad” to hang in our hall in his honor.

I found two websites that will make your jpeg photograph into a pixelated document for free:

One website is pic2pat:   http://www.pic2pat.com/index.en.html

The other is http://vam.demo.lemberg.co.uk/interactive/ppm/landing

I scanned the photo, cropped it, and then used the website to convert it into a document with numbered pixels (squares) that I could print out to use as a guide.  Next I drew a 1/4” grid (with my ruler and permanent marker) on a piece of light weight fusible interfacing, and placed it fusible side up on my portable ironing surface.  I cut strips of my hand dyed brown fabrics just a bit wider than 1/4”, and I sorted/numbered them light to dark.

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Using the numbered grid as my guide, I started choosing and cutting individual 1/4” squares and “tacking” them onto the fusible interfacing with my small iron.  In areas where more than one square was the same color, I used strips instead. And in large areas with the same number I simply cut squares or rectangles slightly larger than the section.

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It’s very much like putting a puzzle together, but you’ve got a guide to help you.  It’s very “mindless” and relaxing.  I love doing it.

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Here (above) are the strips in a bin helping me keep the numbers straight.

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You can’t see much of anything as you’re putting the puzzle together (see close-up shot above); you just have to trust that it’s going to work.

 

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But when you back up a few feet, you begin to see the photograph come to life!

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Then back up even further, and it really begins to look like something!

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After adding the batting (pellon fleece) and a backing fabric, I took the fusible interfacing with the squares completely cover it, to my Bernina and free-hand quilted using similar colors of variegated cotton thread.

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After adding a striped 3-D border, brown inner border, and paisley outer border and dark brown binding, it was ready to hang in my hallway.  (Sorry for the yellow tint.)

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From a distance, you can really see “Dapper Dad”.

Have you tried pixelating in your quilting?  If not, give it a try—it’s so rewarding.

Beagle1     MosaicCat1  pixelated Josh Rhi   Pixelated Pastor Brad

Hope you enjoyed reading about the process.

Have you tried pixelated quilts? I’d love to hear how your experience was.  Please post your comments below, and include a link to your photo if you can.

UPDATE:  I was so pleased to find out the photo quilt got an “honorable mention” ribbon at the Sun Prairie Quilt Show earlier this week!

  
Until next time, HAPPY QUILTING!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts

Project Quilting Challenge 3

Project Quilting Challenge 3

The third challenge for Project Quilting this winter is: “It’s All About That Thread”.  I don’t have much time.  I have company coming this week!  But I’m determined not miss a challenge this year.  So I opened my Electric Quilt 7 (EQ7) software on my computer and designed a paper piecing block.

Spool1

The software allows you to draw and create any block pattern you can imagine, and it will print it out as templates, applique pattern, or (in this case) a paper piecing pattern.  I tried to draw my spools of Aurifil thread–I think they look okay.

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I printed several patterns on one sheet of paper.  Then I went to my fabric stash.

 

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Using the paper piecing pattern I created little blocks of Aurifil spools full of thread! Here’s one a green one, and a striped one (above).

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But what happens if I sew strips of selvages as the thread?  Interesting.

Spool7

I surrounded each block with strips of batik fabric and then cut them a bit “wonky” so they weren’t all in a straight line, adding a band of dark grey fabric to the top and bottom. A zippered bag for portable hand sewing projects is something I really need anyway, so I added the opposite back side, a bright green zipper, some lining and voila!

Spool9aSpool8

I added a d-ring in one seam so I can attach my mini-scissors.  Isn’t it cute?

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Spool9bSpool9c

I  hope enjoyed seeing the process.  And that you’ll take a moment to stop by the PROJECT QUILTING website and vote for your favorites.  It’s amazing to see all the creativity and what each quilter has come up with.  Just click on the title or photo to see more about each entry.  The voting doesn’t start until Sunday, Feb. 7, at noon through 8 pm Feb. 13, but I have to link this up today.  🙂  I’m so glad I finished it!  …now to get ready for company.

UPDATE:  The voting is done, & my little bag came in #10 put of 51 lovely entries.  Thanks for your vote!

Until next time, HAPPY QUILTING!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts

 

 

 

 

 

Project Quilting Challenge—Confetti

Project Quilting Challenge—Confetti

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It’s January, and time to begin Project Quilting!  As you’ll remember from last year, this challenge is put on by Kim Lacapik of Persimon Dreams blog.  Just like “Project Runway”, Project Quilting has a challenge, a time restriction, and instead of voting someone off, the viewer votes who wins!

I’ve been wanting to participate again this year, because it helps the after-holiday, mid-winter blues, and jump starts creativity.

This week’s challenge (#1) is “CONFETTI”.  Right up my alley.  I immediately thought of the “confetti technique” I first saw demonstrated by Noriko Endo.  I’ve used this technique for many of my art quilts in the past, and was wanting to begin a new one.  This challenge is just what I need to get me going.

First I need inspiration…so I took some time to look through my photographs to find something that inspires me. I think I’ll choose a single tree.  One that is the very first to show it’s color and even start dropping some leaves before the others have turned—and the grass is still green.

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First, I need to prepare some “confetti” by cutting up batiks and some of my hand-dyed fabrics for the leaves…

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Next is the background.  I’ve chosen some hand dyed fabrics for the sky & commercial batiks for the background & foreground.

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I cut and temporarily “paste” strips of grey & black fabric onto the background for the tree trunk & branches.

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Then “sprinkle” and position the confetti leaves.

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Everything gets encased in black tulle & pinned before it’s taken to my sewing machine.

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First I straight stitch around the edges so nothing “falls out”, using dark grey cotton thread and my walking foot.

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After that, I put on the free-motion foot, drop the feed dogs, and sew over the confetti & tulle with different colors of variegated thread.

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I liked the look of circles.

 

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Now I can move on to the bottom half and add the confetti for the leaves that have fallen to the ground.  Everything needs pinning so the confetti doesn’t fall out before I get to the machine!

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It always looks better once it’s all straightened and trimmed.

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I like to add triangles to the corners so the piece can be hung by wooden dowels.  So here you can see the triangles and binding ready to sew by hand.

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And it’s finished.  I’m so glad I got it done in time…it took about 5 days–just finished in time to post today…(deadline is Sunday)…

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I hope you’ll go to Persimon’s Dream blog and vote for your favorite “confetti” quilt.  The voting starts soon…January 10, 2016!!

UPDATE:  The voting has closed, & my art quilt came in #2 (SECOND!!) out of the 67 beautiful quilts entered!  I’m so pleased!!  If yours was one of my votes, I want to say thank you so much for your vote!

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Hope you enjoyed my journey through making the quilted wall hanging this week to enter in PROJECT QUILTING:  SEASON 7 (2016)!!  It was fun.

Until next time, HAPPY QUILTING!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts

Using “Skitch” for Machine Quilting Ideas

Using “Skitch” for Machine Quilting Ideas

You’ve finished the beautiful pieced quilt top, have the backing all ready, and then it hits you—how am I going to machine quilt this?  There are so many options.

I’ve found a way to “play” with different ideas by using my iPad and an app called “Skitch”.

Skitch is an app that allows you to snap something (a photo, etc.) and mark it up, then save it.

It’s available for the following platforms:

  • iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch
  • Mac OSX
  • Android
  • Windows Desktop
  • Skitch Touch for Windows

Skitch3

For more information on the Skitch app, click here  for a tutorial.

So…I simply snapped a photo of my quilt top with my iPad (or you could just take a photo of one block).  Then I opened the Skitch app on my iPad and imported the photo into the program, like this:

Skitch1

I chose the thinnest  “pen” and white–there are several colors to choose from.  I found black or white were easy to see on this quilt.  And then I grabbed my stylus and just PLAYED with designs until I came up with one that I think will work! I sketch out lots of ideas that didn’t work, and just “deleted” them.

Skitch2

How about a continuous curved line?  I can “map” it out on each block and sketch until I figure out a good place to start and stop the needle.  Here’s the design I finally decided on:

Skitch4

…and here it is (below) on my long arm.

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I’m using my “rulers” to help me with the curves…

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I’m able to continuously machine quilt around one entire block, only having to stop/start when I move on to the next one.

Quilt1

I think it’s working pretty well

Quilt2

It was a lot of fun to be able to “play” with several ideas for designs by drawing with my stylus on my iPad with Skitch before actually committing to the design on the long arm.

So here’s the finished quilt top—completely quilted and ready to be trimmed and bound.

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And here’s a close-up of one of the sections (don’t look too closely!)…

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I hope this information was helpful, and that you’ll give Skitch a try the next time you’re pondering how to quilt your finished top.

Until next time, HAPPY QUILTING!

Jane

Mulberry Patch Quilts